Hot Best Seller

India in the Persianate Age, 1000–1765

Availability: Ready to download

Protected by vast mountains and seas, the Indian subcontinent might seem a nearly complete and self-contained world with its own religions, philosophies, and social systems. And yet this ancient land and its varied societies experienced prolonged and intense interaction with the peoples and cultures of East and Southeast Asia, Europe, Africa, and especially Central Asia an Protected by vast mountains and seas, the Indian subcontinent might seem a nearly complete and self-contained world with its own religions, philosophies, and social systems. And yet this ancient land and its varied societies experienced prolonged and intense interaction with the peoples and cultures of East and Southeast Asia, Europe, Africa, and especially Central Asia and the Iranian plateau.   Richard M. Eaton tells this extraordinary story with relish and originality, as he traces the rise of Persianate culture, a many-faceted transregional world connected by ever-widening networks across much of Asia. Introduced to India in the eleventh century by dynasties based in eastern Afghanistan, this culture would become progressively indigenized in the time of the great Mughals (sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries). Eaton brilliantly elaborates the complex encounter between India's Sanskrit culture—an equally rich and transregional complex that continued to flourish and grow throughout this period—and Persian culture, which helped shape the Delhi Sultanate, the Mughal Empire, and a host of regional states. This long-term process of cultural interaction is profoundly reflected in the languages, literatures, cuisines, attires, religions, styles of rulership and warfare, science, art, music, and architecture—and more—of South Asia.


Compare

Protected by vast mountains and seas, the Indian subcontinent might seem a nearly complete and self-contained world with its own religions, philosophies, and social systems. And yet this ancient land and its varied societies experienced prolonged and intense interaction with the peoples and cultures of East and Southeast Asia, Europe, Africa, and especially Central Asia an Protected by vast mountains and seas, the Indian subcontinent might seem a nearly complete and self-contained world with its own religions, philosophies, and social systems. And yet this ancient land and its varied societies experienced prolonged and intense interaction with the peoples and cultures of East and Southeast Asia, Europe, Africa, and especially Central Asia and the Iranian plateau.   Richard M. Eaton tells this extraordinary story with relish and originality, as he traces the rise of Persianate culture, a many-faceted transregional world connected by ever-widening networks across much of Asia. Introduced to India in the eleventh century by dynasties based in eastern Afghanistan, this culture would become progressively indigenized in the time of the great Mughals (sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries). Eaton brilliantly elaborates the complex encounter between India's Sanskrit culture—an equally rich and transregional complex that continued to flourish and grow throughout this period—and Persian culture, which helped shape the Delhi Sultanate, the Mughal Empire, and a host of regional states. This long-term process of cultural interaction is profoundly reflected in the languages, literatures, cuisines, attires, religions, styles of rulership and warfare, science, art, music, and architecture—and more—of South Asia.

33 review for India in the Persianate Age, 1000–1765

  1. 5 out of 5

    George

    A measured and engaging overview of India's 'Persianate' period. I generally agree with the thesis - that Sanskrit and Persian cultures mixed to a greater extent than previous accounts suggest. Although headed by Persianate kings in this period, the only effective way to gain and maintain power was to work primarily within, and pay respects to, the established Sanskrit social order. I found two things particularly fascinating: the accounts of the astonishingly vicious struggles for su A measured and engaging overview of India's 'Persianate' period. I generally agree with the thesis - that Sanskrit and Persian cultures mixed to a greater extent than previous accounts suggest. Although headed by Persianate kings in this period, the only effective way to gain and maintain power was to work primarily within, and pay respects to, the established Sanskrit social order. I found two things particularly fascinating: the accounts of the astonishingly vicious struggles for succession in the Mughal era, and the discussion of the geographical shift of the Ganges which created the social environment for Islam to be commonly practiced. Previously forested areas were uncovered and used for rice cultivation, which meant previously non-Hindu Indigenous peoples converted directly to Islam. As an economist, I'm interested more by the evolution of daily life than long accounts of succession (which is what this felt like at times), but on the whole it was a really satisfying read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Akshay

    A very interesting and eye opening book. The author gets into a lot of detail showing how India steadily got Persianised between 1000-1800AD. So many myths about “1000 years of slavery,” the so-called “Oriental Despotism” of the Mughal Empire and the famous cruelty and fundamentalism of Aurangzeb get busted here. It’s really sad how little we know of our own history and how our history is held hostage to the bigoted communal blinkers of the present day. What’s ironic is that this fundamental mis A very interesting and eye opening book. The author gets into a lot of detail showing how India steadily got Persianised between 1000-1800AD. So many myths about “1000 years of slavery,” the so-called “Oriental Despotism” of the Mughal Empire and the famous cruelty and fundamentalism of Aurangzeb get busted here. It’s really sad how little we know of our own history and how our history is held hostage to the bigoted communal blinkers of the present day. What’s ironic is that this fundamental misunderstanding of our history has its roots in the British times, as the colonial masters felt we would be easier to control if we hated each other. Well, they got their wish!

  3. 4 out of 5

    John

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  5. 4 out of 5

    Zakia Sultana

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brent

  7. 4 out of 5

    Giraffe

  8. 5 out of 5

    Avinesh Shankar

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Swmak

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dеnnis

  12. 5 out of 5

    Heather VanWaldick

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cindy May

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rajat Ubhaykar

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mustafa

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kanhaiya Arora

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tarun

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yesh

  19. 4 out of 5

    'Aussie Rick'

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ali Shehzad

  21. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  22. 5 out of 5

    Warrick

  23. 4 out of 5

    két con

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  25. 5 out of 5

    Siddartha

  26. 4 out of 5

    Will

  27. 4 out of 5

    RJW

  28. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin King

  29. 4 out of 5

    Revanth Ukkalam

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  31. 4 out of 5

    Ketika Garg

  32. 5 out of 5

    Terry Kuny

  33. 5 out of 5

    Mark Chapman

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.